Tag Archives: vegetarian

Stuffed eggplants (Bharli Vangi)

20 Aug

Cooking was not fun for me when I got married, I struggled, I have failed and cried. I felt I am letting down my parents because my dad was an amazing cook, my mother learned late in life but now she is a wonderful cook and I was in no way close to getting there. I felt frustrated so I made a decision to write some recipes down that were dictated by my mother, this is one of them and I always end up making this vegetarian curry better than the last time. So here goes.

Tip : I always cut my eggplants and dunk them in cold water until I get other ingredients ready, this helps in prepping but also helps prevent oxidizing and removes bitter juices if any.

All you need:

  1. 8 small sized eggplants/brinjal – slit lengthwise I prefer to chop off the tops (refer pic)
  2. 1 small onion finely chopped
  3. 1/2 cup roasted peanut powder
  4. 1/3 cup shredded coconut (optional)
  5. 2 tbsp grated jaggery
  6. 1 tsp mustard seeds
  7. 1 tsp sesame seeds powdered
  8. pinch of asafoetida/hing
  9. 1 tsp turmeric powder
  10. 1 tbsp red chili powder(or as required) I use mix of degghi and kashmiri chili powders
  11. 1 tsp goda masala (availale in Indian stores)
  12. salt as required
  13. 4 tbsp oil
  14. 1/2 cup water
  15. cilantro (garnish)

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. In a bowl mix together the onion, peanut powder, shredded coconut, sesame seeds powder, jaggery, 1 tbsp oil, salt, red chili powder, goda masala.
  2. Drain the eggplants and stuff the slit eggplants with this mixture carefully making sure it does not break the eggplants open. Fill only until the slits are filled completely. Hold on to the excess mixture.
  3. Heat remaining oil in a kadhai/wok/pan.
  4. Temper the oil with mustard seeds, as soon as they pop add asafoetida let it sizzle, add turmeric powder and add stuffed eggplants.
  5. Fry them in oil gently for about a minute, turn, fry them again for another minute or so, add half cup of water.
  6. Add the remaining mixture. Cover and cook for about 10-15 minutes until they turn soft. The onions and eggplants leave a little water of their own. If it is too dry add little water.
  7. Remove the cover and cook for another five minutes until almost all the water is evaporated and eggplants are completely cooked and you have a thick gravy.
  8. Season with salt. Stir gently.
  9. Garnish with cilantro and serve hot with chapati or roti.
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Vangi Batata (Eggplant Potato curry)

4 Apr

I have taken a long hiatus. After Dad passed away last year I couldn’t bring myself to write anything. However today I thought let me share what I have been eating. I have started to eat clean. On my way to reduce a few pounds. Reduced meat intake and piling on the veggies. So wanted to share this simple easy Indian recipe which takes less than 30 minutes to prep and make and is super tasty. Or I am rather too quick! Here goes.

Tip: To prevent oxidization of eggplant/brinjal immediately drop the pieces in cold water after cutting them until you prep other things for making the curry. Remove from the water before using the pieces.

All you need:

  1. 4 medium sized eggplants/brinjal – quartered
  2. 1 potato – quartered
  3. 4-5 garlic cloves – minced
  4. 1 inch ginger – minced
  5. 1 inch jaggery
  6. 1 tsp mustard seeds
  7. 1 tsp cumin seeds
  8. pinch of sesame seed powder (optional)
  9. pinch of asafoetida/hing
  10. 1 tsp turmeric
  11. 1 tbsp red chili powder(or as required)
  12. 1 tsp goda masala (availale in Indian stores)
  13. salt as required
  14. oil 2-3 tbsp
  15. cilantro (garnish)

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Heat oil in a kadhai/wok/pan
  2. Temper the oil with mustard seeds, as soon as they pop add cumin seeds, asafoetida and turmeric.
  3. Add minced ginger garlic to the oil and fry it for about 30 second or until raw smell disappears.
  4. Add the eggplant/brinjal pieces and potato pieces. Stir well.
  5. Add the remaining ingredients that is the red chili powder, goda masala, jaggery, sesame seed powder.
  6. Season with salt. Stir well.
  7. Add about a cup of water and let the vegetable curry cook for about 7-10 minutes.
  8. Garnish with cilantro and serve hot with chapati, naan or roti.

Guvar Batata (Indian Cluster beans vegetable with potato)

25 Nov

Guvar is not a very famous vegetable or I’d call it a neglected vegetable in the plethora of Indian vegetables. Mostly consumed in western areas of Maharashtra, it is liked by other communities and added as a part of Sambhar (lentil dal of South India) but it is definitely not popular as okra or eggplants. I personally love it and can eat it any given day. The frozen variety of cluster beans cooks quickly and saves time but if you buy it fresh, traditionally it is washed then the ends are trimmed and the beans are broken into pieces by hand as cutting does not remove the fibers that may get stuck in the teeth or throat when you chew these beans. The older the beans the more fibers that come off, the younger the beans, the fresher and less fibrous ones. Make sure the color is vibrant green and not yellowish green or a faint green. This recipe is typically cooked in parts of western India. So here goes.

Tip: You can boil the beans for 8-10 minutes with a pinch of turmeric and salt if you are in a hurry to cook.

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All you need:

  1. 1 lb Guvar or Cluster beans (washed, trimmed and chopped into long pieces)
  2. 1 tsp mustard seeds
  3. 1 tsp cumin seeds(optional)
  4. 6-8 curry leaves (optional)
  5. pinch of asafoetida or hing
  6. 1 tsp turmeric powder
  7. 1/2 tbsp goda masala (can be substituted by 1 tsp of Garam Masala + 1 tsp of red chili powder)
  8. 1-2 inch pieces of jaggery(can be substituted by 1 tsp of sugar)
  9. 1 medium sized potato(washed, peeled and chopped into bite-size pieces)
  10. 1 tbsp of peanut powder (optional)
  11. salt to taste
  12. 2 tbsp vegetable oil

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Heat oil in a deep pan or wok and add mustard seeds. Let them splutter.
  2. Add cumin seeds, curry leaves(optional) and hing or asafoetida. Let it all sizzle.
  3. Add turmeric and the chopped beans along with the potato. Stir well.
  4. Cover the pan with a flat plate and pour some water over it so that the vegetable is steamed and the vegetable does not burn.
  5. Cook this until the cluster beans and potato are tender about 20-25 minutes (less time will be required if it is half-boiled), stirring regularly in between making sure the vegetable does not stick. Also, if the water evaporates add more on the dish and a few teaspoons inside until it gets cooked.
  6. Add goda masala or red chili powder + garam masala.
  7. Add jaggery, adjust salt. Mix well. Cook until the jaggery melts in the vegetable and is combined well. Turn off the heat.
  8. Finish off with sprinkling peanut powder(roasted peanuts ground into powder). Serve with roti, rice and dal, chapati or naan.

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Kappa (Yucca root) fry Kerala style

6 Oct https://mefoodatarian.wordpress.com/

I should be grateful for the number of followers I have on this blog and I should have titled this post as apologetic because I have been so lazy to post! I have been concentrating more on my other blog. But I honestly want to say sorry to all the ones who believe in me and have followed my blog as faithful readers! Sorry! I have backdated this post but I will be try to be more consistent.

My husband has his roots in Kerala as I have mentioned before. It took me time to learn some of the delicacies of Kerala cuisine but I have definitely caught up with a few. I may not have mastered them since the people in Kerala are generous with the use of coconut oil but it will be difficult to guess that a Maharashtrian has made the South Indian delicacies. Well if anyone wants to see the optimum use of a coconut they should definitely visit a native of Kerala.

Yucca root or cassava or tapioca is what we call Kappa in Malayalam(language spoken in Kerala). Its starchy and can replace potatoes. It is high in carbs and low in protein. It is low in fat and cholesterol-free! So I love it and my husband loves it with beef-fry. I will share the recipe soon. Let’s get down to this one.

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Tip : A clean kappa is one with close ends and has no spots or growth on it. To clean kappa, you will need a sharp knife, strong board and strength! Cut the ends, cut in half, peel, or peel first with a peeler and cut in half and then cut half in half lengthwise. You will see the thread that you see in the pic. It also resembles the core of the pineapple. Trim the core where you see the thread. Cut the remaining part into cubes or quarters.

All you need:

  1. 1 whole Kappa/Yucca root/Cassava
  2. 1 tsp turmeric
  3. 4 red whole dried chilies (I also add finely chopped green chili as I love it hot)
  4. 1 tsp mustard seeds
  5. 1/2 tsp cumin(optional as its not traditional)
  6. 4-5 cloves of garlic, remember to crush the garlic for it to release its oil and coarsely chop it.
  7. 1 small red onion or 3-4 pearl onions chopped finely
  8. 2 sprigs of curry leaves
  9. 2 tbsp oil preferably coconut
  10. Salt to taste
  11. 2 tbsp Shredded coconut to garnish
  12. Water for boiling

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Clean, peel, cube and wash Kappa.
  2. Boil Kappa cubes in water that covers the cubes for about 10 minutes or until tender. Remember to add salt and half the turmeric to the water. Drain the water.
  3. Now comes the tempering. Heat oil and add mustard seeds, once they crackle add the cumin(optional), curry leaves and red chilies.
  4. Now add garlic and onion and saute till onions turn pink(you can even brown the onions if you like).
  5. Add remaining turmeric. Adjust salt.
  6. Add the kappa cubes and mix well. Let the kappa get coated evenly with the entire mixture.
  7. Turn off the heat and garnish with shredded coconut.

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Kayloli (Rice flour veggie omelette/dosa/pancake)

3 Apr

Since Indian masala omelette is a mix of spices with eggs, I could not think of a better translation of what a ‘Kayloli’ is. I am not sure why I would call it an omelette since it does not have the eggs however it has all the spices similar to the omelette and the process is similar too. Then again, I can also call it a Dosa because without the spices it will be similar to a Dosa. It could also be a pancake with spices! Well, Kayloli is a traditional GSB (Goud Saraswat Brahmin) dish, I don’t know the original roots though because Mangaloreans and Karwari families are familiar with it too. This was taught to me by my dad with his own additions to it. This is like an instant breakfast dish. I will also list the alternate version in the tip below which can be used for lunch or dinner. Let me get down to the quick and easy recipe, I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do.

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Tip: You can completely omit all the spices and instead of rice flour soak 2 cups of boiled rice for two-three hours. Blend the rice and cup of shredded coconut just add salt and sugar to it and leave the mixture in the fridge overnight. Fry like pancakes. Serve with curries. You might like it as is. I mentioned in my About section how cuisines are similar in coastal regions. This is very similar to Appam in Kerala. I will try and post that someday.

All you need:

  1.  2 cups rice flour
  2. 1 1/2 cups milk
  3. 1 medium sized onion finely chopped
  4. 2 green chilies finely chopped (Indian chilies are hot and I like it spicy, use 1 if you don’t eat spicy food)
  5. 1 tomato finely chopped (optional)
  6. 2 tbsp cilantro finely chopped
  7. 1 generous tsp turmeric
  8. 1 tsp red chili powder
  9. salt as required
  10. oil for frying

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Combine all the ingredients, spices etc. except oil and milk first in a bowl and like you would whisk pancake batter, whisk it gently until well combined.
  2. Pour milk slowly to adjust the consistency of the batter. Make sure you don’t make it too thick otherwise it will not spread on the pan and will stick and form lumps, nor too thin or it will end up runny and the taste will be compromised.
  3. Heat very minimal oil on a non-stick pan on medium heat and pour the batter in the center with a laddle. Move the pan around or spread with a spatula till it takes the shape and size of  a pancake.
  4. Drizzle little oil on the sides to make sure it doesn’t stick to the pan. Cover and cook for a minute or two or until you see bubbles on top (refer to the pic above)
  5. Flip it and cover it again for a minute or two until crispy and brown on the outside and firm so that raw batter is completely cooked.
  6. Serve hot with yogurt, Indian pickle, ketchup or any preferred chutney.

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Palak Paneer (Spinach and Cottage Cheese)

28 Jan

I would rather post more non-vegetarian recipes than the vegetarian ones, however, one of my new year resolutions include eating more veggies! I don’t hate vegetables but I just get bored of the process of sorting, plucking, washing, chopping, and every vegetable is different, some require boiling, some soaking, some grinding, unlike meat, cut, wash and ready to use. Among my favorite ones, spinach(Palak), fenugreek leaves (Methi), hard cottage cheese (Paneer), and dill(Shepu; unfortunately the men in my house dislike)but I end up making spinach or use it in some other dish. So, let me zoom in on one of my favorite Indian vegetarian recipes, that is Palak Paneer. It depends if you want to fry the Paneer(cottage cheese pieces) first or just dunk and cook them in the sauce in the last few minutes.

Tip: To keep the color of spinach intact, boil water, once your washing, sorting of spinach is done, drop in the entire spinach to wilt in the water for just about 2-3 minutes, do not cover. Remove or strain and immediately dunk in ice-cold water. Let it sit for a few minutes and then puree it roughly not smoothly in a blender.

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All you need:

  1. 1 large fresh Spinach bunch roughly pureed (washed, sorted-only use leaves)
  2. 200 gms or about 8 oz.Paneer (Hard cottage cheese found in Indian stores) cut into squares or rectangles.
  3. 2 medium size onions finely chopped or fine paste ( I prefer chopped)
  4. 2 medium size tomatoes finely chopped or pureed (I prefer chopped)
  5. 1 tbsp ginger garlic paste
  6. 2-3 green chilies finely chopped (adjust as per your taste)
  7. 1 tsp cumin seeds
  8. 1 bayleaf
  9. 4 cloves
  10. 1 inch stick of cinnamon
  11. pinch of turmeric
  12. 1 tsp cumin powder
  13. 1 tbsp coriander powder
  14. 1 tsp red chili powder
  15. 1 tsp garam masala(I use home-made, will post the combination soon)
  16. 1 tsp dried fenugreek leaves (kasoori methi) – this is optional
  17. salt (as required)
  18. oil 2 tbsps
  19. 1 tbsp roughly chopped cilantro(garnishing)
  20. 1 tbsp beaten cream (optional)

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Heat oil on a low flame in a deep saucepan(kadhai). (If you wish you can fry the paneer pieces on medium heat until golden at this point and keep them aside and use the remaining oil)
  2. Add all the dry masala(bayleaf, cumin seeds, cloves and cinnamon) one by one. Saute for a few seconds until you can smell a nice aroma.
  3. Add chopped onions and saute until translucent. Add the ginger garlic paste and fry for about a minute or till the raw smell goes away.
  4. Add the green chilies, saute for another minute. Add the tomatoes and saute until they are soft.
  5. Add all the powdered masala except garam masala (turmeric, cumin, coriander, chili) and let this cook for about 4-5 minutes stirring occasionally  or until oil oozes out from the sides.
  6. Add the pureed spinach and mix it until well blended with the spices. Cook this until the sauce is bubbly and oozing out oil for another 3-5 minutes.
  7. Drop in the raw paneer pieces and gently stir them until everything is well combined and cook this for 4-5 minutes. Add salt.
  8. Add the garam masala and stir gently. Let this simmer for 3-5 minutes.
  9. Crush the dried fenugreek leaves between the palms of your hand and add them to the sauce(remember the fenugreek is optional, skip this step if you don’t have it)
  10. Turn off the heat and let the sauce sit for 2-3 minutes. Just before you serve it hot, add the cilantro and cream. Mix gently, Done! Serve hot with roti or naan.

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Simple Zuccotto

27 Nov

It is late in the month, my posts are generally updated early in a month but I am so excited for my travel that I am hardly finding time to get on the computer. It is freaking chilly here in Texas now I don’t like typing with cold rough hands! Ha! Excuses, excuses…well, excuse me for daring to try something far far away from my culture and traditions and stepping out in a new zone. I tried zuccotto, although I made this in a single serving size in case I fail, but I did not(don’t judge the first pic, it was a trial), so here is a full fledged recipe of an Italian dessert…a simple zuccotto. I call it simple because it is not one of the fancy ones! Ha!

Tip: You can use different liqueurs for different flavor for a personalized zuccotto. If not essence works fine. You can go absolutely fancy with frosting, icing, nuts, etc.

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All you need:

  1. 1 sponge/pound cake (rectangle shaped)
  2. 3 cups vanilla icecream/favorite ice-cream
  3. 3 tbsp almond or favorite liqueur (I used amaretto)
  4. 3 tbsp brandy(optional but I would not skip it 😛 )

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Slice the entire top half of the rectangular cake and invert a bowl (round shaped) on the rectangle piece. Cut around the edges. This will form the base of zuccotto and I will call this a lid. Set aside the round piece or the lid.
  2. Slice the remaining cake into long rectangular pieces. Arrange the slices side by side making sure they overlap so that the icecream filled inside does not stick out and remains a surprise! Lightly press the slices against the bowl.
  3. Trim off excess edges around the bowl. The round piece has to go on top so make sure that the edges are trimmed.
  4. In a separate bowl combine the liqueur and brandy and sprinkle all over the cake in the bowl. Press again lightly to make sure all the spaces are nicely secured. At this point you can add dry fruits, berries or chocolate chips in the ice-cream if you want. If you don’t have any of that move on to the next step, remember I didn’t have any of this!
  5. Dunk the the icecream to fill in the entire cake. Spread evenly.
  6. Cover with the lid(the round piece/base). Make sure you cover the cake with lid immediately, cut earlier in a round shape.
  7. Wrap the entire bowl with plastic wrap and pop it in the freezer for 2 hours, you can then refrigerate it further upto a day.
  8. When it is ready just invert on a plate. Cut as you like. Done! Or you could go fancy with the frosting, icing, do whatever you want to! Yum!

Rajma Chawal (Rice and Kidney bean curry)

15 Aug

My north Indian friends introduced me to the real Rajma Chawal and I am so hooked on to it. It’s a favorite comfort food for many! With proteins packed in the red kidney beans, it’s a healthy way to get children and adults to like it. There are only a few places where you can get the authentic Rajma Chawal. Otherwise everyone else has their own version of Rajma Chawal. Obviously if you visit a North Indian home, you will have one of the best home cooked Rajma Chawal. This is one of the few vegetarian dishes that I absolutely adore. Eating the entire cooked rajma the next day, instead of eating the same day you cooked it, with fresh steamed rice is like you are in a mini heaven of your own! Enough of talking, let’s get to it.

Tip: Soaking twice and rinsing and draining the beans several times helps reduce the gas that is built up due to the complex sugar in the beans ( One of my friends who is a nurse told me once and its true, my tummy hardly bloats up while eating beans).

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All you need:

  1. 1 cup Rajma or red kidney beans (soak overnight in about 4 cups of water, if possible drain the water once and soak in fresh water again before sleeping)
  2. Water 4 cups
  3. 1 tbsp Ginger-Garlic paste
  4. 2 medium sized onions finely chopped
  5. 1 large tomato pureed
  6. 2 bay leaves
  7. 2 black cardamoms
  8. 1 inch cinnamon stick
  9. 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  10. 1/4 tsp red chili powder
  11. 1 tbsp coriander powder
  12. 1/2 tsp garam masala powder
  13. Salt as required
  14. 3 tbsp Oil
  15. 1/2 tsp kasoori methior dried fenugreek leaves (if available, you can get this in any Indian store)
  16. For garnishing you can add cilantro or lime wedge and sliced onion.

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Wash and drain the soaked rajma again.
  2. Cook the rajma in a pressure cooker with 4 cups of water, salt, whole masala that is bay leaves, cinnamon and cardamom , most Indians use pressure cooker, you can use your own vessel to cook the beans till they are soft and fully cooked. It may take anywhere between 45 minutes to an hour. Don’t overcook them till they are mushy or it will end up looking like a dal instead of a curry!
  3. Once cooked, reserve the liquid, don’t throw it away. Drain the liquid in a separate bowl. You can remove the bay leaves, cinnamon and cardamom if you wish at this point, I like to leave it all in there.
  4. Now, heat oil in a saucepan or kadhai on medium heat. Add the onions and fry them till they change color, you can even fry them till they are golden brown, but I prefer to fry them till they are transparent to pink.
  5. Add the ginger garlic paste and fry till the raw smell disappears or till 30-45 seconds. Add the pureed tomato.
  6. Add all the spices one by one, turmeric, chili powder, coriander powder and fry all the spices till they are well combined.
  7. Add the rajma/cooked beans and combine well with the mixture followed by the reserved liquid or the stock.
  8. Toss in the garam masala powder and kasoori methi(if available). Mix well. Check seasoning.
  9. Bring the curry to a good boil and simmer it for around 10 minutes.
  10. Garnish with cilantro or lemon wedge and sliced onion.
  11. Serve hot with steamed white rice or chapati(Indian flatbread).

Sabudana Khichdi (Sago)

6 Aug

When Indians fast for religious purposes, most of the times, they end up eating more because the “allowed” food is rarely prepared and is tempting when the tummy is growling. I am not sure if all the attempts of sacrificing our favorite daily food reaches God and if he blesses us based on this type of sacrifice, people will hardly get blessed! We eat more than usual at times of fasting.  In many western parts of India, the most famous fasting food is Sabudana Khichdi. Sabudana is sago or tapioca. It is dried and made into flour and then goes through a plant and ends up looking like white pearls. Well, I am more interested in eating rather than knowing what it is! this dish does need overnight soaking. Just a heads-up.

Tip: Be careful with soaking the sabudana in water. You don’t want a soggy or sticky khichdi.  If you see sabudana sticking while its getting cooked, splash a little milk about 1-2 tsp in it. Khichdi will become soft and not sticky.

All you need:

  1. 1 cup Sabudana or tapioca pearls small variety (found in Indian stores, prepped a day before)
  2. 3 tbsp Ghee or clarified butter/ Oil I use half-half ratio
  3. 3 Green Chillies finely chopped
  4. 1 Potato boiled and thinly diced (optional)
  5. Cumin seeds – 1/2 tbsp
  6. 1/2 cup roasted peanut powder (Roast peanuts without the skin on a pan. Cool and grind)
  7. 1 tsp sugar
  8. Salt as required
  9. 2 tbsp Cilantro chopped  (for garnishing)
  10. Lemon juice or wedge (for garnishing)
  11. Yogurt as needed (to serve,optional)

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Wash Sabudana thoroughly but gently – 3-4 times. Do not rub or crush it in hands. Drain.
  2. Add water except just a little that is about 1/4 cup or just covering the sabudana enough. Cover and soak overnight. Next day, it will double in size, check if it breaks easily if you press it between fingers. And they should not stick to each other otherwise you will end up having a rock like texture and will be hard to chew. If they don’t break easily, add just a little water in the vessel less than a quarter cup and cover for an hour. Drain the entire water.
  3. Mix in half the peanut powder in the sabudana gently.
  4. Heat ghee/oil in a pan on a medium heat and add as soon as the oil is hot, add cumin seeds and let it change color in about 10-15 seconds.
  5. Add green chillies and the potato pieces here. Let it cook for less than a minute.
  6. Stir in the sabudana. Mix gently.
  7. Keep stirring for around 5 minutes on high until they are are almost cooked.
  8. Reduce heat and cook for around 7-8 minutes. Check if the sabudana is no more white from inside. If you see its still white, cook for a few more minutes.
  9. Add salt, add sugar. Mix gently.
  10. Add the remaining peanut powder.
  11. Garnish with chopped cilantro and lemon wedge or sprinkle lemon juice. Serve with yogurt!

Bread Upma (Sindhi)

2 Jul

I am a big fan of one of my Sindhi friend’s cooking. She is a complete home-maker and I love gorging on food that she makes with so much love and efforts. I have been looking around for various dishes of Sindhi cuisine, and this one is so easy. I think it is called ‘ Seval Dabal’ but I will confirm the original name. I confirmed the name, it is ‘Seyal Dabal’. Although she hasn’t checked the authenticity of this dish, I am sure she will like it and so will everyone who loves Bread Upma as we call it. Original Upma is a dish with roasted and steamed semolina flour. But this Bread Upma is different than its varieties, it does not have semolina, has bread in it and tastes completely different than the dry one that Maharashtrians make. Makes a good breakfast!

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Tip: Trim the edges of the bread if you prefer softer version, if you want to feel the bread in it, you can keep them.

All you need:

  1. 10-12 slices of bread ( I had whole wheat, white will taste better)
  2. a pinch of asafoetida ( we call it ‘hing’ in Hindi/Marathi)
  3. 1/4 tsp mustard seeds
  4. 1/4 tsp cumin seeds
  5. 1 medium sized onion finely chopped
  6. 1 large tomato, finely chopped
  7. 1 green chili, finely chopped ( I use serrano, even half is good for my level of spice, you can adjust as per your taste)
  8. 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  9. 1 tbsp coriander powder
  10. 1 tsp red chili powder
  11. Oil to fry (3 tbsp is what I took)
  12. Salt to taste
  13. Water (as needed)
  14. For garnishing chop a few sprigs of cilantro and little lemon juice

Ready, Set, Go:

  1. Tear the bread slices into small pieces, make sure they are bite size but not mouthful.
  2. Heat oil in a pan, add mustard seeds and hear them crackle, then add cumin seeds and asafoetida.
  3. Add onions and fry till they change color and become a little pink.
  4. Stir in the green chili and tomato.  Saute for a few minutes till they blend well in the pan.
  5. Add the spices, turmeric powder, coriander and chili powder. Add a tablespoon of water, it helps in blending the masala well. Saute till the tomato becomes soft.
  6. Add a cup of water and salt. Once it boils, fold in the bread slices. Check that the water is enough and won’t keep the bread dry. Don’t add so much water that the mixture turns soggy, just enough to make it soft and moist. Mix well and let it cook for a few minutes.
  7. When you feel the water is completely absorbed, turn off the heat, sprinkle cilantro and lemon juice.
  8. Serve hot.
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